What to do when a candidate rejects the initial salary offer?

Unfortunately, a candidate does not always accept the first salary offer. But thankfully, there are ways to manage through this roadblock. Here are three options on how to handle these types of situations.

Stick with it. Your first option is always to stick with the initial offer. However, this is the riskier option, especially if your organization badly needs the manager’s skill set in the position. If you choose to stick with your original offer, describe the clear path to increased responsibilities and job opportunities. The increased salary typically comes with them, if he or she stays with your company. Salaried hospitality managers who are considering a long-term relationship may review their position.

Reassess the offer.  If the management candidate has a superior skill set compared to other applicants, perhaps an increase in salary may be well worth the investment in terms of the value the candidate’s skills and experiences will return.

Improve the benefits. If you simply can’t move on the dollar amount, consider beefing up the candidate’s benefits package. “Non-traditional” benefits, like “creative” work hours, tickets to cultural or sporting events, assistance picking up dry cleaning or scheduling family appointments can all attract top talent, even if the salary offered isn’t the candidate’s first choice.

In many cases, it is less expensive to the business to increase the offer or the benefits package than it is to start the recruitment process from scratch. Taking a flexible approach to salary negotiations and knowing where your company stands in terms of offering competitive compensation can help you weather rejection and secure a top candidate.