Performance Management For the Hospitality Industry pk7xptcppsa-liu-zai-hou

First of all, Performance management is one of those catch phrases that few managers understand, even fewer members of the management community can execute. However, it is an extremely marketable skill for job seekers and Restaurant Management Candidates.

Restaurant managers who hope to enjoy a long successful career can benefit by learning how to use this skill set.

As powerful as performance management is as a tool, very few businesses establish a framework that will connect the executives to the employees. Like all good management tools, it is misused by executives and managers with unrealistic expectations.

The problem with performance management is that the executives’ ideas are rarely executable within the budget.

They expect too much from the staff or create demands that make life miserable for the people on the floor.

To succeed, the process needs an intermediary who can create that framework, and bridge the gap.

The Executive View of the Restaurant

In addition, the average business strategy focuses on business improvement through strategic change, optimization, and value improvements.

The key focus is customarily operations, leadership, finance, and performance.

The executives create the plan, and the staff is expected to utilize their talents, skills, and experience, to deliver the necessary improvements.

The staff are seen as an asset and are often grouped in a very black and white projection of the restaurant’s business model.

The key focus is customarily operations, leadership, finance, and performance.

Create the plan, and the staff is expected to utilize their talents, skills, and experience, to deliver the necessary improvements.

The staff are seen as an asset and are often grouped in a very black and white projection of the restaurant’s business model.

The Staff View

Employees do not see themselves as fixed resources, similar to financial or computer systems.

Their performance cannot be measured and managed using the same benchmarks.

However, their personal values, family, emotional health, physical health, obligations, likes, dislikes, and ambitions are ignored when creating the strategy.

The conflict between the business and the people is seen in the reports and projections. The ‘human’ element of

In addition, the conflict between the business and the people is seen in the reports and projections. The ‘human’ element of staff are often seen as peripheral to the pursuit and achievement of the business goals and objectives.

The Manager’s View

Consultants and Executives often avoid many of the real world, human, elements because they ‘ruin the charts.’

The manager needs to learn what was omitted from the report. They also need to be able to bring up pertinent information ‘after the fact.’ In many cases, they do not see a project until the planning phase is over.

No matter how many times the executives run into problems because they didn’t consult the managers, they repeat the mistake.

A good manager learns how to anticipate this and be able to tell the job interviewer how they avoided problems without laying blame on the executives or the staff.

Employee Management Strategy

Finally, the best strategy is to know your team and this goes beyond conducting performance reviews every three months.

The Tools

“If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it!”

The one benefit of using a template or software program is that never changes.

When everyone is using the same data then everyone can anticipate what might happen in the future.

Data is the manager’s #1 tool. When the business owners can use information within the restaurant’s environment the strategies will be more relevant.

Lastly, Presenting data to the executives also prevents backlash when a program doesn’t work. If the executives have the data before they make their plans.