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Most of the resumes submitted to job websites, and forwarded for management jobs, are from unqualified candidates. All professionals want to move up the job ladder. But reaching too high, too quickly can leave candidates feeling less valuable, or unqualified for the job.

Before walking away, take the time to assess where you are on your career development curve. A few minutes assessing your skills and experiences may help you assess which jobs applications you should submit to, and which ones can damage your career.

On The Job Manager Training

If you want an employer to pay you to learn then job then you need to bring something to the table that has value. What skills do you have that hospitality companies need? How can you make them money?

Show  Don’t Tell – Organization Skills

There are people who are good at organizing, and there are people who have trained to organize on a multi-level, indepth, and fundamental level. Organizing on a parallel is easy. But being able to shuffle every level when a random action shuffles the charts takes experience and knowledge.

There are many ways to learn organization skills without holding down a manager’s job. Having these skills before applying can make learning, and managing the day to day tasks, easier.

Organizational skills are one of your Career Capital, Marketable Skills, that can make you valuable to a prospective employer

Teamwork is a Management Technique not a Catch Phrase

The hospitality doesn’t need more managers who are ‘good with people’ but really have no idea how to control the staff and motivate them to work. If you are good at teamwork then it is important to explain, and show, why you make those claims. What practical, tangible methods do you have of showing your skills?

Teamwork, and ‘people skills’ is one of those grey areas where non qualified candidates feel that their own personal experiences are enough. Unfortunately there are several field of studies that raise personal experience to a level that turns ‘people skills’ into a management tool that is extremely valuable to prospective employers.

Some skills that you should take at least one course on includes: Organizational behavior, communication styles, learning styles, personality types, motivational tools, written communication skills, negotiating, collaboration, public speaking, customer service, sales,  life coaching, active listening, report writing,

Education

While the hospitality industry does not demand a Doctor of Management (DM) or Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) a candidate must have the skills needed to effectively manage a restaurant or hotel. Taking the industry courses for certification, and as many management courses as possible. Do it as a favor to yourself. The more you understand about managing in the hospitality job, the faster you will learn, and the easier/less stressed each day will be.

Education does not need to be formal, academic. All you need to show is your dedication to success, your passion for the job, and your willingness to improve your skills.

What Have You Invested Into Your Career?

Have you invested time and money into your career? It doesn’t look good when a candidate feels they are qualified and want an opportunity to put their experience and skills to work, but they haven’t even taking free online courses in management.

The internet is full of low cost websites like Udemy.com or Lynda.com. These courses are taught by industry professionals and are often less than $50. While they are not indepth they do show an employer that you are willing to invest your spare time into your career.

If you are not willing to invest into your own career, why expect a future employer to invest in you?

Report Writing

Manager’s jobs are intangible. Manager’s pay is high. The best ways to continually prove you are worth your pay is to write financial, organizational, and marketing reports. Create templates of your reports so that you can add them to your portfolio when looking for a new job.

Organizing structure and systems that govern employees, create procedures for departments to follow, and design benchmarks and guidelines is a great way to prove to prospective employers that you are a valuable asset to their business.

Management is an Attitude

Management Candidates need a good attitude. But this doesn’t mean a good outlook on life. It doesn’t mean you are a positive person. In fact, it doesn’t have anything to do with your emotions. What a professional manager has is the ability to control their emotions, collaborate and negotiate with people they do not like, and stay positive and stress free when facing the biggest crisis of their career.

There is always room on a resume to hint that you have taken courses, and invested in your personal wellbeing. That you can handle stress. And, that you are able to handle people.

Can management trust you to get the job done when everything is going wrong. If you are ready to be a restaurant management candidate then you know that things can spiral out of control in minutes, and a solution needs to be immediate.


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