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When it’s time for a raise, it’s one of those discussions that can make even the most confident employee nervous. The potential for opening up a can of worms is high; if the employer says “no” to your request, it may mean they feel you’re not doing the job. Or, perhaps the company isn’t doing well, and raises aren’t possible, which is something no one wants to hear.

But no matter your fears, asking for a promotion is a necessary part of the work world. In some instances, if you don’t ask, you definitely will not receive. So, the best step for career advancement is to have that difficult discussion with your boss. But before you take the plunge, here are three tips you need to know.

Prepare yourself

We don’t mean take a deep breath, although that’s not a terrible idea. Instead, prepare yourself for the process by doing your research. Start by looking at your current job description. Write down the following:

  • Think back to what you’ve accomplished in your current role. Have you exceeded expectations in any areas?
  • Do you have specific instances where you received praise from a customer?
  • What have you learned in the role?

Next, if you’re seeking a promotion to a specific role, take a look at that position. Be prepared to discuss how your current work will enable you to excel in the new role.

Finally, if you’re just seeking a raise and not a promotion, take a look on Glassdoor to determine the average salary for your role in your area. One strategy to consider is if you’re being offered a promotion, that’s a good time to negotiate salary. One thing to note; men are more likely to negotiate salary than women. That’s a statistic that clearly needs to change!

Ask for the meeting

The last thing you want to do is blindside your manager, so start with an email asking to set a time to seek some feedback on your performance and future with the company. Remember, if you don’t ask, you might not receive.

Follow up

Receiving a raise and promotion is amazing. Make sure you follow up with a nice email thanking your boss sincerely. If you didn’t receive the promotion, try not to be too hard on yourself. But do make sure you ask for specifics about why you didn’t get the role and how you can improve. If promotions or raises aren’t occurring at the time of the discussion, ask to revisit the issue in 90 days or six months. If you’re missing critical qualifications for the role you were seeking, ask your boss to provide you with a list of what you need to take that next step up the ladder.

Getting a raise and promotion isn’t about luck. It takes hard work, perseverance and a willingness to hone your skills. If you’re ready to apply these characteristics to your next role, talk to the talent team at Gecko Hospitality. We’re here to help you land the job you deserve.

Gecko Hospitality

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